CRCA men's race clinic is this coming Sunday

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16 replies [Last post]
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous

Anyone done this in the past? Just wanted some feedback on what it was like. It certainly sounds like fun: http://www.racelistings.com/register/events/flyer.asp?ID=265
http://www.crca.net/coaching/introclinics.htm

Anonymous's picture
Heath (not verified)
I am signed up

I am signed up. I am just going to see if I don't get dropped.

Anonymous's picture
JT (not verified)

It's supposed to be for true beginners. They say somewhere that nobody gets dropped.

I wonder what the pace is and how intense the ride is.

Anonymous's picture
Heath (not verified)
Where did my reply go?

Last night I had replied to this post. This afternoon it is gone. I did not think I said anything offensive.

Anonymous's picture
Matt Purdue (not verified)

"I race CRCA ""B"" now. From what I remember, it is hard to get dropped from the clinic. When I did it they had ""escort riders"" ahead of and behind the pack to keep riders together.

When I did it, they ""neutralized"" the field like this until the last 1/2 mile of the last lap, near the carousel. Then they opened it up for an all-out sprint to the top of Cat's Paw.

If you have even the slightest interest in racing, I encourage you to come out. Don't worry about getting dropped."

Anonymous's picture
Heath (not verified)
Sprint up cat's claw.

Is the finish line on the top of the climb, or is it further down the road where it levels off?

Anonymous's picture
Matt Purdue (not verified)

The finish line is at the crosswalk at the very top of the climb. Good to see you are already planning your winning sprint. ;-) Of course, the format of the clinic might have changed since I did it two years ago.

Anonymous's picture
Heath (not verified)
Sprint

If the sprint ends at the top of the hill, I might have a chance. I cannot compete with the real sprinters.

Anonymous's picture
John Miller (not verified)

I did the May clinic last year and had a blast. i see that it's again run by CRCA Moneygram and they did a terrific job.

the morning begins with an explanation of race rules, descriptions of technique and a short question/answer period. short because they could see the animal gleam in everyone's eyes and quickly put us on the start line. it was a larger field than they expected, well over fifty riders.

The first lap was neutralized by the instructors; they rode in front to control the pace, so no one flew off. this allowed the pack to remain pretty much together the first time around the park.

the last two laps they opened up the front and encouraged attacks; other instructors rode alongside the pack to give instructions on positioning or handling -- like keeping your line on the hill or not half-wheeling the rider in front. still other instructors trailed behind to try towing dropped riders back to the pack.

wherever possible, they made sure different groups of riders worked together, playing off the energy of the pack. and yes, everybody was flying! i mean, not that anybody i saw was big-ringing up Harlem Hill, but i was pegged the entire way around and the flatter sections of the park saw us cruising at 24-27mph.

i'd never felt adrenaline like that. my HR monitor had never scared me more. i found that i felt like i could climb for the first time, bettering my position on the hill because i'm a bit of a wuss on the descents. i made it to the bottom of Cat's Paw but had _nothing_ left. there were even some spectators -- other CRCA peeps, i think, because who else is awake at that hour on a weekend -- screaming at us to leave it all on the road. a microcosm of what a pro race must sound like, but they are voices i still hear when training.

the uphill finish is smart, and comical -- it prevents a probably reckless sprint by dozens of the hopelessly oxygen-indebted, but it also means i was standing in my drops, eyes bulging and tongue out, pumping across the line at what must have been 12mph. i never saw the winner, but i was thrilled to have finished at what appeared to be the back of the gruppo.

there is a short plug for the CRCA after the race, and they give out some modest prizes. there are some prizes at the end -- a helmet, some tools, everyone went home with a little goodie bag.

never had more fun for less money.

i'll be back this year -- i'll be in a Colombia jersey, bright gold, blue and red.

Anonymous's picture
Peter (not verified)

"I did the clinic last July. It was definitely a great experience. But… be ready to go all out from the start. There was no neutralization. There were some guys who had raced before and also CRCC ""C"" racers in the race. At one point on the flat near Engineer's Gate, our speed was 27 mph. People definitely got dropped. The CRCA club members who rode as coaches were very helpful and encouraging. O yeah, don't go too early for the finish line sprint. Wait until you start to crest the hill. It's a longer distance than you think!"

Anonymous's picture
JT (not verified)

"That last description make me nervous. Why would a CRCA ""C"" racer ride in the beginners clinic? The CRCA ""C"" field averages 15:20 minute laps in a 6 lap race. It would be no fun to get dropped like a stone in the first 1/2 mile and ride the rest of the way alone."

Anonymous's picture
Peter (not verified)

The C racers are the beginning racers. Don’t be nervous. Try it out. It’s worth doing. There will be people to ride with. One of the things that the coaches encourage is for riders to work together. So you should not get totally dropped and have to ride by yourself. It is only 3 laps and if you don’t do it, you will never know what it is like to race. I finished at the front of the second group. I was disappointed with my result, but I have never regretted trying it out.

Anonymous's picture
Suomynona (not verified)
relax, its as easy as riding a bike

JT, tranquillo! You surfed the CRCA site enough to know the C average, which is what all of us did back when we were in your shoes - and we all were at some point. So you've got the bug. Awesome - grab your helmet and get out there. It's low pressure, no hassle, no worries. Don't sweat it.

Racing bikes ain't rocket science. Every newbie is intimidated - that hurts the growth and acceptance of our sport. It shouldn't be the case.

Don't idolize the pros. Don't wait for July to get excited about bike racing. Stop daydreaming at your computer. Get out there and learn to race, you can do it, you'll get more of a blast out of one clinic than watching someone win seven tours consecutively.

Your tour de france is right there, buddy, waiting for you. At 6am on Sunday. It's so damn close you can taste it! Don't deny yourself. I strongly encourage you and anyone with the interest, $10 and the ability to get up at 5:30 on Sunday to try it out. Don't have the $10? I'll loan it to you.

There are hundreds of us in CRCA, all shapes, sizes, ages, genders, abilities. We want you with us. Each one us is cheering you on, right now. Can you hear us? We've got the clinics, the members, the coaching, the teams, the racing. What more can we do? We want nothing more than to teach you how to race, and then race with you. But we need you to set the alarm clock and take that first pedal revolution, pal.

We'll see you Sunday. We're really looking forward to it. Afterwards, please come back here and tell everyone how glad you are you did it. Then join CRCA, or Kissena, or any other club or team. Or race by yourself. We don't care, we'll still cheer you on. We're proud of you for just coming out. Spread the enthusiasm. Kill the intimidation factor. Relax and have fun.

(PS Everyone - everyone - got dropped at some point. Multiple times. That's of no concern. When its happens, relish it. It's not a sign of failure. It is a guaranteed sign that you are on the right path. The question is, do you then hang up your helmet and pout, or do you get out there again next week and try even harder? I know what I did. What will you do?)

Anonymous's picture
jt (not verified)

Hey, that was inspirational! You should be a professional motivational speaker. You certainly sold me on it -- I paid up and registered. See you Sunday...

Anonymous's picture
Matt Purdue (not verified)

"If any new racers have any questions, feel free to come look for me and my teammates on Sunday. We'll be racing in the B race. We wear green and black jerseys with ""Setanta"" on the front and back.

It's a great bunch of guys who will be happy to offer advice."

Anonymous's picture
John Miller (not verified)

I did the May clinic last year and had a blast. i see that it's again run by CRCA Moneygram and they did a terrific job.

the morning begins with an explanation of race rules, descriptions of technique and a short question/answer period. short because they could see the animal gleam in everyone's eyes and quickly put us on the start line. it was a larger field than they expected, well over fifty riders.

The first lap was neutralized by the instructors; they rode in front to control the pace, so no one flew off. this allowed the pack to remain pretty much together the first time around the park.

the last two laps they opened up the front and encouraged attacks; other instructors rode alongside the pack to give instructions on positioning or handling -- like keeping your line on the hill or not half-wheeling the rider in front. still other instructors trailed behind to try towing dropped riders back to the pack.

wherever possible, they made sure different groups of riders worked together, playing off the energy of the pack. and yes, everybody was flying! i mean, not that anybody i saw was big-ringing up Harlem Hill, but i was pegged the entire way around and the flatter sections of the park saw us cruising at 24-27mph.

i'd never felt adrenaline like that. my HR monitor had never scared me more. i felt like i could climb for the first time, bettering my position on the hill because i'm a bit of a wuss on the descents. i made it to the bottom of Cat's Paw but had _nothing_ left. there were even some spectators -- other CRCA peeps, i think, because who else is awake at that hour on a weekend -- screaming at us to leave it all on the road. a microcosm of what a pro race must sound like, but they are voices i still hear when training.

the uphill finish is smart, and comical -- it prevents a probably reckless sprint by dozens of the hopelessly oxygen-indebted, but it also means i was standing in my drops, eyes bulging and tongue out, pumping across the line at what must have been 12mph. i never saw the winner, but i was thrilled to have finished at what appeared to be the back of the gruppo.

there is a short plug for the CRCA after the race, and they give out some modest prizes -- a helmet, some tools, everyone went home with a little goodie bag.

never had more fun for less money.

i'll be back this year -- i'll be in a Colombia jersey, bright gold, blue and red.

Anonymous's picture
Herb Dershowitz (not verified)

Is Setanta the team El Jefe races for?

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