C-SIG Resources

2014 C-SIG Schedule

Classification Ride: Saturday, March 1
Rides 1-8: Saturdays, March 15-May 3

Contact: [email protected]

 

C-SIG Coordinator

  • Lisa Helburn

Stats & Roster

  • Mitch Levine

C-SIG Leaders

  • C-SIG 1: Sosi Ermarkaryan
  • C-SIG 2: True Sims
  • C-SIG 3: Kate Mostkoff
  • C-SIG 4: Tamara Lipshie
  • C-SIG 5: Carol Waaser
     
  • Evelyn Badia
  • Shawn Batey
  • Hannah Borgeson
  • Dana Brandley
  • Michael Chapman
  • Andrea Cortes Comerer
  • Ellen Egeth
  • Kerith Gardner
  • Laurie Godfrey
  • Deborah Greilsheimer
  • Stephanie Gross
  • Aparna Kane
  • Elizabeth Kelly
  • Kathy Kendall
  • Marla Kerner
  • Rick LaRoche
  • Cara Lipshie
  • Allen Lum
  • Laurie Malkoff
  • Mercedes Michel
  • Jim Olson
  • Paul Racine
  • Denise Roche
  • Gwynna Smith
  • Simon Smith
  • Justin Wasik
  • Scott Wasserman
  • Nick Watkins
  • Leonora Wiener
  • Jim Zisfein

Coordinated Emergency Response

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C-Sig Training Series

Coordinated Emergency Response to a Major Accident on a Group Cycle Ride
(with thanks to Jason Barcoff, EMT and Ed Fishkin, MD whose tips were incorporated)

Ideally there will be four people each prepared to take on one of the following roles so they can be done simultaneously. Otherwise some may have to be done in sequence.

  1. Call 911. The most important information is location. Try to provide name of town as well as cross streets. If unsure look for manhole covers (most in Bergen County have name of town on them) or numbers posted on telephone poles. If possible give information about what happened and condition of the victim(s)--but don t delay making the call to gather this information.
  1. If victim is in the road, protect them from traffic. If possible to do so without risking your own safety, position yourself between the victim and oncoming traffic. Direct traffic around the victim. You can use your bike as a barrier to make yourself more visible.
  1. Attend to the victim. If there is anyone who knows CPR or has more advanced training they should take this role. If you don t have any training, just keep the victim from further harm: don t move (or allow the victim to move) head or trunk unless absolutely necessary (could contribute to paralysis if there is spinal injury); don t remove their helmet (could be holding things in place if there was a head injury); don t give food or water. If they are conscious, talk to them. Just make sure they don t nod or shake their head in response (don t want them moving head or neck). Let them know help is on the way. Of course if you have CPR or more advanced training use your training and judgment (e.g. if the victim has no pulse/respirations and needs CPR and there s no way to administer it without moving them better to risk paralysis than death).
  1. Crowd control. Get other riders and bicycles out of the road and away from the victim. The person in this role should confirm that all 3 other jobs above are being done and check to see if the others need assistance: if so, other riders can be individually delegated to help. Just don t allow people to wander in the road or crowd the victim.

 

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